reaching out

Spinal Cord Injury BC      ANNUAL REPORT 2015

REACHING OUT

THE ECONOMIC TOLL OF SCI

80percentmen
49percentolder
AS OUR POPULATION AGES
THE NUMBER OF NEW SCIS WILL INCREASE.
employment
dollarcost
wheelchaircost

SOCIAL SCI

1810members
peercoordinator

magazine
4,338

people received The Spin magazine

website
76,648
visits to our website
newsletter
1,162
subscribed to our Peer Newsletter

Facebookengaged
map events

twitter
2,754
Twitter followers
youtubered
446
YouTube subscribers
youtubeviews
48,853
YouTube views

QUESTIONS ANSWERED

Last year the SCI BC InfoLine service received 2,830 information requests. 1,635 were phone calls and 1,195 were sent by email.
WHO CONTACTED US?
13%Family/Friend
18%General Public
53%Person with SCI/Related Disability
16%Health Care Agency
TOP 5 REQUESTS     1. Housing     2. Recreation    3. Funding     4. Health      5. Equipment

database
16,636

visits to our online SCI BC Database
(63,314 page views)

housing
3,921

visits to our SCI BC Housing Board
(34,060 page views)

jobboard
1,634

visits to our SCI BC Job Board
(5707 page views)

swapnshop
4,217

visits to our SCI BC Swap & Shop
(95,377 page views)

From the time we meet people with new injuries, to the time they go home and adapt to their new lives, our peer and information services staff are always just a phone call away. (At 1-800-689-2477, in case you were wondering.)

INCLUSION: "Allow Wheelchairs, Too"

Three years ago, Spinal Cord Injury BC asked the organizers of the Scotiabank Charity Challenge for one simple thing. The result? A 5k race without barriers, 40 members on our Team Walk 'n' Rollers, and $37,000 raised for spinal cord injury. Our best Charity Challenge turnout yet!

COMMUNITY: "It didn’t matter that we’re disabled. It’s amazing how capable I feel now!"

Several years ago, a seemingly minor accident sent Trevor to the surgery room.

He would spend the next 11 months in a hospital bed, unable to walk, with friends moving on and his family living far away. Inside, Trevor faced the darkest moments of his life—and he attempted the unthinkable.

trevandkirst



Luckily, Trevor met someone who was able to draw him out of this dark place.


Kirsten understands what it’s like to be in a wheelchair—she has lived with her own injury for 23 years.With encouragement from Kirsten, Trevor started coming out to SCI BC events and met others facing similar challenges. He now draws strength from his new circle of friends and feels comfortable talking with them about anything. And the program has given Trevor the confidence to try new things—like an adventure trip to Whistler in the summer.


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It was incredible — I went zip lining and kayaking! It didn’t matter that we’re disabled. It’s amazing how capable I feel now!... As a newcomer to the world of spinal cord injury, I thought my life was over. Staff at SCI BC opened their arms and hearts to me during a time when I had no hope to live. And while every day is a struggle to survive, I keep fighting. I can’t thank them enough. They saved my life.

POSSIBILITY: SCI BC TV

Our YouTube series, launched in 2014, keeps you informed, engaged and up-to-date with the latest in SCI—from adaptive sports and recreation, to community events and research. Join our host, Kirsten Sharp, as she explores, celebrates and connects with the SCI community.

UNDERSTANDING: “It's good to hear from others with similar issues.”

What is it like to live with an invisible disability? When five of our Peers shared their stories of incomplete spinal cord injury in The Spin magazine, it really struck a cord. Men and women from cities and towns around BC wrote in, saying they finally felt understood and included. To them, our Summer 2014 issue was more than a good read. It was the message they’d been waiting for: “You are not alone.”
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"I WAS 39 WHEN I WAS INJURED IN A CAR ACCIDENT.

I relate totally to the issues of fatigue and depression, feelings of not being quite a quadriplegic whilst still dealing with all the problems of mobility, sensation, temperature regulation, bowel and bladder dysfunction, neuropathic pain, spasms and limited hand/arm function.

And I am still working with all the questions; acceptance still comes and goes.

Thank you for the articles about people from my tribe—it’s good to hear from others with similar issues."


— Karin Watson, 71, Courtenay, BC

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I INJURED MYSELF CATCHING A FALLING PHYSIOTHERAPY PATIENT when I was 37. I felt my back snap.

I am now 72 years old. Constant daily pain has lead to chronic depression. The more depressed I am, the more I notice the pain... However, I can walk short distances with the aid of a cane. So, in the town where I was injured, too many people asked why I wasn’t working or if I was having a good holiday. It took my mother 25 years to realize that I would not get better.

I would like to thank you for “An Incomplete Affair” in The Spin, Summer 2014. I can readily identify with the problems discussed—particularly having an invisible injury.

— Lynn Mackenzie, 72, Terrace, BC

OPPORTUNITY: "Education is the Great Equalizer."

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OUR FIRM’S BEEN INVOLVED WITH SCI BC FOREVER, BUT I’VE BEEN THE PERSON PRIMARILY RESPONSIBLE FOR THE RELATIONSHIP SINCE ABOUT 2011. THIS YEAR, I’M STARTING A NEW SCHOLARSHIP FOR PEOPLE WITH SPINAL CORD INJURIES.

Growing up in a small town in Northern Saskatchewan, I didn’t have the same advantages that other people had but I did have the same opportunities, and I always recognized that as a gift. I never really considered myself an underdog. As long as I had the same opportunity, I could always achieve as much as anybody else — even people that had more of a head start than I did. And I believe the same thing for people that are injured.

schooling

Education is the great equalizer. If you have an education it doesn’t matter if you’re poor, it doesn’t matter what sort of social disadvantage you may have. I think if you’re going to double the challenge, you need to tweak and increase the opportunity for people — to the playing field.

That’s why I thought about the scholarship. I strongly believe that challenge coupled with opportunity can be the strongest gift you ever give anybody.

— Scott Stanley, Lawyer, Murphy Battista LLP

IMPACT: "I am touched by the immense heart."

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"I work as an RMT on Saturna Island, BC. I am on the Health Committee on this island and, through the Medical Clinic office, have come into contact with your magazine. I read it from front to back… articles and ads! I am touched by the stories and the pictures and the information! But I am most touched by the immense heart that comes through every page—and through your website.

I do not have an SCI, although I deal with some spine issues from old injuries. I actually do not know of anyone who has an SCI. That doesn’t seem to matter.

The stories are universal and the information, invaluable."

— Sandra Kriese, RMT